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Once again, May has been a busy month for Vet2Cat, with so many lovely kitties to choose from! It was a tough decision but we selected three cats which just bowled us over with their lovely characters.

Sooty loves rolling around with a Valerian sprayed cloth

Winner – Sooty

Our winner for the month of May has to be the sensational Sooty! Sooty has been a previous runner-up but his winning personality has earned him the right to be winner!

Sooty is always extremely excited to see the Vet2Cat team, especially as we always bring him his favourite toy; a cloth sprayed with valerian.

Sooty’s human servant decided that she really ought to buy him some valerian spray (aka Pet Remedy) to have at home.

Now his favourite monkey toy is sprayed regularly for hours of fun for Sooty!

 

Buffy being huffy, other times she’s fluffy!

Runner-up – Buffy

A runner up for May is the beautiful, bold Buffy. In her twilight years of 18 Buffy’s owner was convinced that the time was approaching that she would have to let Buffy go. At this point Buffy was not moving about very much and despite a good appetite she would get very constipated.  After our initial assessment it became evident that Buffy was crippled with arthritis and was also suffering from high blood pressure. After careful monitoring with her blood pressure tablets and her arthritis medication, and a gentle laxative to ease that burden, Buffy rules the roost once more! To Buffy, 18 is just a number!

 

Oooh, look at that face!

Runner up – Tilly

A truly well-deserved runner up is the timid but very affectionate Tilly! This little lady had started to limp a bit, which led her human companion to call in the Vet2Cat team to assess.

It transpired that Tilly was suffering from painful arthritis affecting all four of her limbs – not just the obviously lame one. This really surprised her owner as she, like many others, thought that this was a condition that only affected the much older cat. At only 10 years old, it is sad Tilly is so badly affected, especially as osteoarthritis is an incurable disease that progresses, the best we can do is to manage pain and make some adjustments in the environment to help them get around more easily.

After trialling some anti-inflammatory pain relief, Tilly is now doing the “zoomies” on a regular basis, with little signs of slowing down. Tilly’s owners are thrilled to see her back to her happy self again.

It seems an opportune time to bring to your attention that a brand-new medicine called SOLENSIA is now available for the treatment of arthritis in cats. This ground-breaking new product has far fewer potential adverse effects on the body, acting on pain in a completely different way to anti-inflammatories.

Keep your eyes on our Vet2Cat posts for more information, or contact us directly to discuss! Phone 07842570273.

 

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Cat of the Month –  February 2020

February’s selection of cats that have put a smile on our faces as we go about our work includes, Lulu, Paddy and Parker.

And the winner is – PARKER!!

Promoted from runner up in January to winner in February! Vet2Cat is very proud of Parker, as are his hoomans. The reason being – he had to go off to see the specialist ophthalmologists at Optivet in Havant http://www.optivet.com/, and we were all a bit worried about how he would cope with this, generally not being the most tolerant of patients. But a dose of gabapentin pre-travel and the wonderful eye vets Prado and Natalia were singing his praises! He was so well behaved for his examination there.

Vet Claire referred 15-year-old Parker after finding some abnormalities at the back of his eyes. This was during a follow up visit regarding Parker yowling at night and doing some odd things. Although Claire suspected Parker had hypertension (high blood pressure), the multiple tiny ‘fluffy’ lesions seen did not seem typical for the classic hypertension changes we normally see, so an expert opinion was sought. The outcome – the changes were chalked up to hypertension after all, but very early stages. This stage is not often seen as we usually miss it, we often disregard these behavioural changes in older cats as ‘just his age’- perhaps a bit of senility. Parker had even had a BP check in October which was normal and was due to have another routine check this April. Fortunately, because Parker’s dad is very attuned to Parker’s demeanour, he picked up that something was amiss very quickly, and got straight on the phone to Vet2Cat! Finding and treating this from an early stage has likely saved Parker from going blind.

The CatCareForLife programme recommends cats above the age of 7 years have a yearly blood pressure check and cats over 11 years have this checked twice yearly. Check out this chart of recommended routine health care for cats: https://www.catcare4life.org/app/uploads/2018/03/Recommended-examinations.pdf

Parker disturbed from his afternoon nap to have a vet check up. At least he can get straight back to it when we’re done!

“That’s the spot, right there!”- Paddy gets a good scratch from Emma

Runner Up – Paddy   

Lovely Paddy made COTM runner up back in October. Since then his gastro-intestinal problems got worse, so an investigation was begun. Vet Claire performed an ultrasound and found an abnormal section of his intestines. To really get to grips with ongoing intestinal disease, biopsy is generally required, so Paddy was referred to Lumbry Park Specialists, where he underwent endoscopy – a flexible camera with biopsy tools is passed down into the stomach and first part of intestines and samples are taken (under a full anaesthetic!). The biopsy results showed he has ‘chronic enteropathy’ – a broad term meaning there is inflammation of the intestines, but fortunately no signs of cancer.

A long battle of wills began, trying to convince Paddy to eat the very specialised diet that was prescribed to the absolute exclusion of everything else – no mean feat! He also needs twice daily pilling with steroids and gut protectants, and we have had to use various other medications to encourage him to eat as well as reduce his signs of vomiting and nausea. Nurse Emma visited to show Paddy’s carers how to administer all these pills, and now Paddy is quietly resigned to having this done. He is thankfully showing improvement after many weeks, but it will still be many months of special food, medications and re-assessments before he will (hopefully) be fixed.

Runner Up – Lulu

A recent convert to Vet2Cat, Lulu’s mum is over the moon about our home visiting service. Lulu kept missing follow-up appointments at the vets because she was so difficult to get in a carrier. Because of this her vaccinations had lapsed, and she hadn’t had a good once-over for a while. Visiting Lulu at home, is a different story entirely. She is a very friendly cat and spent most of the time sitting on assistant Helen’s lap purring and kneading. She was only a bit miffed when she realised we weren’t just visitors but were there to give her a jab, flea and worming treatments!

“What do you mean this is a vet visit?!” – Lulu giving Helen a good kneading.

The Five Freedoms of Animal Welfare

These apply to all animals in the care of humans, whether a house pet, a horse, farm or zoo animals:

  1. Freedom From Hunger and Thirst
  2. Freedom From Discomfort
  3. Freedom From Pain, Injury or Disease
  4. Freedom to Express Normal Behaviour
  5. Freedom From Fear and Distress

Purrfect Health Club

At Vet2Cat we offer monthly health plans to help spread the cost of your cat’s preventative health care.
Our range of monthly health plans have been devised to cover different cats’ lifestyles, ages and individual needs.
Read more about our Purrfect Health Club here.